Viewing Costumes at Unhyeongung Palace

settingstonesTraditional costumes at Unhyeongung Royal Residence

I wrote earlier about this lovely unofficial palace in the heart of Insadong, Seoul. It’s a delight to just wander around and note the layout and architecture. It’s also very interesting, as many of the rooms facing the different courtyards are furnished and mannequins display the dress styles of various stations of life of the times.

If you stop to look closely and read the information boards you can learn a fair bit about how the people of those times dressed, and what was considered appropriate. It all seemed to be quite formal, and each article of clothing had a special name. It was also a little confusing to me, as some of the clothes looked very similar to each other. I guess I’m not familiar with the finer points and details.

I randomly picked some to share here. Enjoy! (Pictures are below each description).

First; After King Gojong’s ascension to the throne, Sanggung (Court ladies) and Nain (Court lady attendants) were assigned to Unhyeongung Palace to manage its housekeeping. Here we see them in the kitchen.

1

No 2: Sanggung (Court lady) wearing a blue-green dangui (or dangeui), a woman’s outer coat. King Gojong’s biological mother, Lady Heung-sun, is seated, wearing a pink dangui.

2

No 3 is a room in Norakdang (women’s quarters). We see royal women’s wear here in a beautifully decorated room.3norak

 

No 4: Lady Heung-sun was the mother of King Gojong. When staying at the Norakdang she wore a skirt and jacket called Chima and Jeogori respectively.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

No 5: Dangui is a simple type of ceremonial dress that is put on over Jeogori and Chima. Court ladies wore dangui made of deep watermelon Jamisa, a kind of patterned silk.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

No 6: The bodyguard escorting Lord Heungsun was called Cheonhajangin. They wore Kweja and Hyupsoo. A Hyupsoo is a kind of coat with narrow sleeves, made of naturally-dyed cotton or silk.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

No 7: Policemen wore a long sleeveless vest of dark blue color, called Jeonbok, and a shirt with silk or cotton sleeves in white, called Hyupsoo.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

No 8: Military officers wore Hyupsoopo, an orange silk coat with a red neckline, and Jeonbok, a long vest of hand-woven silk, tied with a deep blue sash called Kwangdae. When out in the field, they wore a Jeonrip, a black felt hat.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s